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Archive for the ‘HOW Some Of It Works — The Technologies’ Category

P-47 Roaring Glory Warbirds outtake -- 062913

P-47:  Roaring Glory Warbirds Documentary

posted by Engineman Preserved Wook

The great flaw is that in the flying sequences there is to be heard a load of induced static, possibly from the ship’s electrical systems. 

However, not just a pretty movie, this lengthy treatment gives a comprehensive description of the development & engineering of the aircraft, as well as some beautiful in-flight cinematography:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75RwPrdAej8

[Engineman Wook

[all rights revert to holders

[29 June 2013]

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Republic P-47C-2-RE Thunderbolts of the 61st Fighter Squadron, 56th Fighter Group 41-6265 identifiable, 1943 -- 062813

Flying the Thunderbolt

by Preserved Wook

At along about twenty-eight minutes actual flying happens with the P-47; what is really good are the air-to-air shots as the lieutenant starting transition training to the fighter is shown banking and, then, practicing some stalls, wheels up & wheels down:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KnwIYwEh6o

 The shots are very clear & show just when he gets his angle of attack PAST (more…)

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Uncrating & Assembling A P-47 Thunderbolt On The Battlefield!

by Engineman Preserved Wook

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2D3k0sJ8HM

This really is a great training movie in its own right & our folks were REALLY some great people to have come up with stuff like this…

And plus there is NOT a single laptop or iPod to be found anywhere, not within anyway…sixty years!

I can only hope now on the downslope of (more…)

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by Engineman Preserved Wook

From the begining of American heavy industry, this image of a small coal loading ramp in Pennsylvania, from the Kahndog online photo collection, opens the door onto a vision of our earlier industry as it really was in America in the high modern period just before and after the Civil War; we are so used to thinking now of Andrew Carnegie, U S Steel and all of that, as well as “globalization”, as to forget completely that (more…)

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by Engineman Wook

The great question is, in the Stephensonian age when the basic layout of the high modern and late-modern steam locomotive was evolved, how did design engineers first arrive at the need to “shape” blast pipe rhythmic emissions with various nozzles?  What led them to perceive that mechanically to increase the geometrical area of the sides of the exhaust jets would effectively entrain more flue gases at a greater rate?
     In that connection the following question-and-answer exchange turned up by me online in the Summer is (more…)

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by Engineman Wook

In England (the “UK”), the Bure Valley “cute little” Norfolk excursion railway had major saturated-steam locomotive re-design problems:

http://www.martynbane.co.uk/modernsteam/bvr/bvr-1.html
 
What is of interest is that the syndics of the tourist-trap rail attraction rejected the expense of adding steam superheating as such, and yet mechanical engineer Ian Gaylor nonetheless could make significant performance-improvements in part by redesign of the ZB-class locomotives valves & smokebox along the lines of up-to-date ejector theory:

http://www.steam-loco-design.co.uk/zb_article_2.html

Also, room remains for later installation of steam superheating.

[Engineman Wook

[all rights revert to holders

[11 July 2010]

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by Engineman Wook

IT is my purpose in the following to summarize the history of the development of the steam locomotive exhaust system in such a way that readers will first of all get the basic smokebox setup into their heads, as it finally came to be in the period 1896-1960.
     This then will enable them to read with full understanding the following linked material, about the most recent steam railroading developments in the late-twentieth century and the first decade of the new millenium.
     Although for a number of reasons these took place overseas, they nonetheless are of the greatest importance in railroading in North America and worldwide.

THIS Is because coal remains our most abundant available fuel and, so, steam locomotion still (more…)

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